World Oceans Day: June 8, 2013

World Oceans Day: What’s That?

World Oceans Day is a day set aside each year on June 8 to celebrate the world’s five oceans (Pacific, Atlantic, Indian, Arctic, Southern or Antarctic) for their inherent value as well as for the seafood they provide, the marine life they nurture and the international trade routes they contain in order to move products around the globe.

Besides being a day of celebration, World Oceans Day also calls attention to the critical challenges we face relating to our oceans: world-wide pollution and over-consumption of fish that has resulted in threatening reductions of most fish species. It is a day to sponsor and/or attend one of over 600 events scheduled in over 55 countries all over the world with the goal of taking action by participating in efforts to clean-up shorelines, organizing conferences to disseminate information and inspiring individuals of all ages to focus on the preservation of the marine environment.

Here’s an excerpt of a message from Ban Ki-moon, Secretary-General of the United Nations, on the first World Oceans Day in 2009:

Indeed, human activities are taking a terrible toll on the world’s oceans and seas. Vulnerable marine ecosystems, such as corals, and important fisheries are being damaged by over-exploitationillegal, unreported and unregulated fishingdestructive fishing practicesinvasive alien species and marine pollution, especially from land-based sources. Increased sea temperaturessea-level rise and ocean acidification caused by climate change pose a further threat to marine life, coastal and island communities and national economies.

World Oceans Day is sponsored by The Ocean Project and the World Ocean Network. The World Oceans Day website, listed above, contains a list of the participating sites, suggested resources and educational materials.

The Wave at The National Aquarium in Baltimore, MD for World Oceans Day

We are thrilled to be installing The Wave as part of World Oceans Day at the National Aquarium in Baltimore.  Located in Baltimore’s Inner Harbor, the National Aquarium is expecting up to 10,000 visitors during the June 8 and June 9 weekend, many of whom will participate in World Oceans Day by making a piece of The Wave.

 

 

Annals of The Wave, #2

The Wave Installation at the New Britain Museum of American Art

Over the course of two days on May 9th and 10th, Elena and I, with the assistance of Collections Manager, John Urgo, and his crew, installed The Wave at a height of approximately 20 feet and spanning about 150 feet from front to back between the two main buildings of The New Britain Museum of American Art.

Highly visible from the entrance of the Museum, from all of the windows of both the Chase and the administrative buildings, from the café and its adjoining patio/sculpture garden and from Walnut Hill Park that is adjacent to the Museum, The Wave hangs in a series of 6 long, undulating strands. When the wind blows, the installation emits a loud, crashing roar like the sound of an incoming wave as it hits the shore. It has already been reported that visitors all the way across the park can hear The Wave rumbling in the distance.

On June 2, 2013, The Museum is holding a family day ‘wave-making’ event.  Wave pieces made that day will be added to the installation as a ‘waterfall’ cascading from the roof of the administrative building to the patio below.  As promised in my previous post, Annals of The Wave, #1, here are some ‘after’ shots of The Wave at the New Britain Museum of American Art.

 View of The Wave from the front of The New Britain Museum of American Art, #1, Courtesy of Elena Kalman


View of The Wave from the front of The New Britain Museum of American Art, #1, Courtesy of Elena Kalman

 View of The Wave from the front of The New Britain Museum of American Art, #2, Courtesy of Elena Kalman


View of The Wave from the front of The New Britain Museum of American Art, #2, Courtesy of Elena Kalman

 View of The Wave over the patio of The New Britain Museum of American Art, #1, Courtesy of Elena Kalman


View of The Wave Over the Patio of The New Britain Museum of American Art, #1. Notice the Reflection of The Wave on the Windows of the Cafe on the Right and the Shadows of The Wave on the Patio. Courtesy of Elena Kalman

 Detail of The Wave Over the Front of the New Britain Museum of American Art With Reflection in the Windows. Courtesy of Elena Kalman


Detail of The Wave Over the Front of the New Britain Museum of American Art With Reflection in the Windows. Courtesy of Elena Kalman

 Detail of The Wave at The New Britain Museum of American Art, Courtesy of Elena Kalman


Detail of The Wave at The New Britain Museum of American Art, Courtesy of Elena Kalman

 

 

 

Annals of The Wave, #1

Why Annals of The Wave?

Many people over the last year and a half have asked us how we go about selecting the location for The Wave at a specific site and how we design and install the site-specific installation.  So, in response to these questions, I’ll be devoting a post or two, periodically, to that process and calling it, ‘Annals of The Wave.’

The Wave at the New Britain Museum of American Art: May 11, 2013 – August, 2013

On a very cold and gray February day, Elena and I visited the New Britain Museum of American Art (NBMAA) in New Britain, CT to determine where and how we would install The Wave. We had just received word that The Wave was a ‘go’ and our goal on that day was to decide, along with the Museum staff, what was the most appropriate space for it.  All of us had previously agreed that an outdoor setting in May would be ideal for several reasons: (1) The Wave will greatly enhance the outdoor experience of the Museum and can remain in place through the end of the summer; and (2) 600 pieces of The Wave in the installation at the NBMAA were created by New Britain’s Gaffney Elementary School students, teachers, staff and parents and will be up when New Britain students and parents attend the Museums’ annual student art exhibition in June.

Elena and I had originally thought that we’d create a multi-colored ‘waterfall’ cascading off the facade of one wall adjacent to the Museum’s patio and sculpture garden that would ultimately spill onto the nearby grass and dissipate into a ‘pool.’ Learning that day that none of the walls would be appropriate since The Wave there would either block an important sidewalk egress or compete with sculptures already in place, we came up with an even more exciting plan: to construct an enormous, undulating ‘wave’ over the patio itself, using a fan-shaped wire framework connected from the rooftops of the two Museum buildings.  Adding to the appeal of this design is the fact that the patio is used during the spring, summer and fall as an outdoor cafe′ and The Wave would serve as a ‘canopy’ over the entire space.

The three photos below show two versions of the Museum’s patio in February as viewed from several directions and one image of the wire framework suspended by the Museum staff that we will use when we install The Wave later this week.

 Patio of New Britain Museum of American Art, February, 2013


Patio of New Britain Museum of American Art, New Britain, CT, February, 2013, #1

 Patio of New Britain Museum of American Art, February, 2013, #2


Patio of New Britain Museum of American Art, New Britain, CT, February, 2013, #2

 Wire Structure for The Wave, Suspended Over NBMAA Patio, April, 2013, Courtesy of Kathryn Matsuzaki


Wire Structure for The Wave, Suspended Over NBMAA Patio, New Britain, CT, April, 2013, Courtesy of Kathryn Matsuzaki

Stay tuned for ‘after’ photos showing the space with The Wave installed.